Since when are unprepared high school graduates the business community’s responsibility?

October 3rd, 2006

A survey of human resource professionals concludes that U.S. student’s are insufficiently prepared for the work world.

In response, tadalafil sickness Sister Joel Read, cialis canada mind co-chairwoman of the education committee of the Greater Milwaukee Committee said, shop

“Teaching is not a profession that’s held in high regard by the business community, and I think it’s come to roost, so to speak”

She added:

Much as a company would work with a supplier to improve components it found inadequate employers must help educators instead of just criticizing them.

Unfortunately, Sister Read is mistaken.

When a supplier doesn’t meet a company’s need, that company just gets a new supplier.

H/T Boots and Sabers.

Entry Filed under: Observations,Uncategorized

5 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Casper  |  October 4th, 2006 at 8:36 am

    I’ll disagree with you on this one. Although I wouldn’t agree with Sister Read if she were saying that businesses should subsidize schools, I do agree with the assertion that a business and supplier should work together to determine what this best product is to meet the businesses’ needs. Feedback from the consumer, in this case, the employers, is always good. Just saying “your product sucks” but not offering constructive criticism (it sucks because you spend too much time teaching people the wrong thing, how about teaching them something like X) is an invitiation, from employers, for failure.

  • 2. Administrator  |  October 4th, 2006 at 9:23 am

    You’re point is valid, but mine is more so.

    In the real world, it’s exceedingly rare for a company to work with a substandard supplier to fix that supplier’s problems.

    There are too many other supliers offering better products/services.

    What a company will do is tell a supplier what they want and then expect the supplier to deliver.

    For example, Walmart says: I want the price of scissors to be 20% less. If their current supplier can’t do it, Walmart doesn’t help them retool their factory, they get a new supplier.

    The same will happen with workers.

    Business has already TOLD education what they want: they want workers who can read, who can do basic math, who can solve every day problems.

    The Sister wants business to go further and help schools achieve those things. That is NOT what business does in the real world. So, as I stated, her analogy is flawed.

    Also, eventually employers will do with workers what they already do with parts…if they aren’t good enough here, they’ll get them from somewhere else.

    Business is not responsible for the failure of our schools. Educators and the Democratic politicians that protect them from being held accountable are.

  • 3. Brian  |  October 4th, 2006 at 12:04 pm

    Also, eventually employers will do with workers what they already do with parts…if they aren’t good enough here, they’ll get them from somewhere else.

    Well, no and yes. Depends on the people they need.

    Generally, if the local workforce are lunkheads, the business will relocate. The new factory won’t be across town, but in another state. Or country.

    But you know this.

  • 4. Dean  |  October 4th, 2006 at 8:39 pm

    My own, though admittedly not very scientific, survey shows that most U.S. students are not prepared for life. But I deal with a different group of students than most.

  • 5. Melinda Omdahl  |  October 6th, 2006 at 4:32 pm

    The sister said:
    “Much as a company would work with a supplier to improve components it found inadequate employers must help educators instead of just criticizing them.”

    Ummm… does anyone else think that the Sister is a more than a unqualified to speak about what it is exactly that companies do or do not do?

    I don’t see many Sisters in the cubicles of any companies that work with … ever.

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